No it is never the time for murder

National Post | News

Canadians must begin to debate whether we are prepared to embrace “therapeutic homicide,” says an editorial in the nation’s leading medical journal.

A recent report from an all-party committee of the Quebec national assembly recommending medical assistance to die is moving the debate over euthanasia “from theory toward practice,” says the just-published editorial in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

“Which way will legislation go? Will the rest of Canada follow? Those who care about the answers to these questions must speak up now, and with conviction.”

[np-related]

The editorial comes days after a B.C court stuck down Canada’s ban on doctor-assisted suicide, ruling it unconstitutional, and granting a B.C. woman dying of Lou Gehrig’s disease the right to a medically hastened death.

In March, Quebec’s Dying with Dignity commission recommended that rules be established to shelter from prosecution doctors who offer terminally-ill patients “medical assistance to die.”

The Criminal Code…

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CRITICALLY IMPORTANT

The Chart

Judging by the ruckus that followed TIME magazine’s cover story of a woman breastfeeding her 3-year-old (while standing up), one might think that mothers are nursing young boys and girls all the time.  But the statistics show the opposite is true.  

According to the latest CDC statistics 75% of new moms start out breastfeeding their new babies,  but by 6 months, only 44% still are and only 15% are exclusively breastfeeding. By the time a child is a year and a half old, only 8%  are still being nursed.  Now a new study sheds some light on why many moms are not meeting their goals for exclusive breastfeeding.

The study, published in the journal Pediatrics on Monday, finds that many women plan to exclusively breastfeed their babies, but once the baby is born, they can’t do it as long as they had hoped.  Researchers asked 1,457 women who were in their third trimester if they intended to exclusively breastfeed…

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National Post | Full Comment

Politicians jumping aboard the anti-bullying bandwagon tend to ignore some of the obvious potential unintended consequences of legislation, such as the bills currently being considered at the Ontario legislature. One is that by defining bullying incredibly broadly — for the sake of the children, of course — and demanding a crackdown, they are effectively inviting schools to punish or expel children in circumstances that, subject to dispassionate individual analysis, might seem extreme. It’s a perennial cycle: bad things happen; politicians demand “zero tolerance” solutions; different bad things happen; politicians demand an end to “zero tolerance” solutions.

But you don’t often see as spectacular a case of unintended consequences from anti-bullying efforts as the Ottawa Citizen reported today. In an activity designed — one can only assume — to bolster empathy among students, “almost 60 girls in Grades 4 to 6 … were asked … to write a secret on a…

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The Chart

Editor’s note: In the Human Factor, we profile survivors who have overcome the odds. Confronting a life obstacle – injury, illness or other hardship – they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn’t know they possessed. This week Krystal Greco, 16, shares her story about pursuing her passion despite a life-changing injury.

Ever since the age of four, I’ve been a horseback rider.  It never occurred to me that a day might come when I wouldn’t be able to ride. But March 7, 2010, was that day.

It was a normal Sunday afternoon. As usual, I had woken up late. I was showering and started feeling some cramping in my lower back, which wasn’t uncommon because I was being treated for a stress fracture in my lumbar spine. I was out of the shower and partially dressed when it happened — the explosion of pain.

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